In the Tyrol it was believed that All Saints Day was the day in which the “wretched souls” were released from the fires of Purgatory and allowed to wander the earth freely for a day. This unusual “day release” ended with the tolling of the “Schidungläuten“ (curfew bells) on All Souls Day. In the afternoon, old and young alike joined the solemn procession around the churchyard (in many places three times). 

After the All Souls Day procession the godchildren then traditionally visited their godmothers or “Goutln“ as they are called in the local dialect. Wealthy farmers’ wives used to have up to twenty or thirty godchildren whom they would treat to sweet coffee and shortbread. Each child was also given an animal made of short pastry to enjoy at home. A boy would get a hare, stag or horse (“Rössl”) and a  girl a hen.

These light and airy plaited yeast bread creations are still made today in many bakeries in the Pustertal, especially for the first and second of November, and are just as tasty for breakfast as for brunch or afternoon tea.

Local customs and festivals are part of the unforgettable holiday experiences. Plan your stay in Innichen now and send us your non-binding booking enquiry.