Törggelen and "Keschtn" (chestnuts)

The Törggelen tradition started many decades ago in close connection with the wine-growing culture: everyone who had helped with the wine pressing was invited in the period between October and the start of Advent to taste and judge the new wine. The hungry helpers were also rewarded with tasty homemade dishes. The word “Törggelen” derives from “Torggl”, wine press, and originally “Törggelen” meant going from one wine press to another to taste the new wine (“Nuier”) and the sweet grape juice (“Suser”).

In order not to drink the wine on an empty stomach, bacon, sausage, sauerkraut, aromatic alpine cheese, schlutzkrapfen, potatoes, dumplings and for dessert roasted chestnuts were served.

Like wine, the sweet chestnut is an integral part of South Tyrol culture. The sweet chestnut has been grown throughout the Mediterranean and the neighbouring northern countries since ancient times. Where chestnuts grow and people do the rounds of the wine presses there are also usually the chestnut paths for “gourmet walks”, e.g. the “Keschtnweg” from Neustift via Barbian to Ritten, or the “Kastanienweg” in Völlan in the Meran district.

Not only are chestnuts delicious but they are also healthy.
As a basic foodstuff, the sweet chestnut enables our bodies, which are often too full of acid, to find their balance again. During the wine-tastings the chestnut is normally roasted and is sometimes enjoyed with butter. Chestnut puree is very digestible and goes well with ice cream or cream.

If you want to know where in October you can do the rounds of the wine presses or wander through the finest chestnut woods, our receptionists will be pleased to help you.